Gurdev (Dave) Judge MD, an Allergist
Board Certified in Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Board Certified in Pediatrics
Allergy Doctor, Specializing in Pediatrics and Adult

Cary Office: (919) 859-5966
North Raleigh: (919) 870-6440
Wake Forest: (919) 562-7195
Accepting New Patients

Gurdev (Dave) Judge MD, an Allergist

Board Certified in Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Board Certified in Pediatrics
Allergy Doctor, Specializing in Pediatrics and Adult
Cary Office: (919) 859-5966
North Raleigh: (919) 870-6440
Wake Forest: (919) 562-7195
Accepting New Patients
Schedule An Appointment

Dr. Judge an Allergist, was Trained at Duke University Medical Center as a Allergy Doctor
Asthma, COPD, Bronchitis, Pneumonia, Trouble Breathing, Wheezing, Exercise Induced Asthma & Chronic Cough, Practicing in Cary, Raleigh & Wake Forest

What is Asthma?

Asthma is a long-term (chronic) lung disease that causes episodes of coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath. Like all chronic illnesses, asthma cannot be cured, but it is very manageable.

 
Asthma Symptoms
 

According to the leading experts in asthma, the symptoms of asthma and best treatment for you or your child may be quite different than for someone else with asthma.

  • Coughing: Coughing from asthma is often worse at night or early morning. Sometimes it’s your only symptom. It can be dry or mucus-filled.
  • Wheezing: This is a whistling or squeaky sound especially when you breathe out. Sometimes wheezing can be heard easily; other times you need a stethoscope.
  • Chest tightness: This can feel like something is squeezing or sitting on your chest.
  • Shortness of breath: You may feel breathless, like you can’t catch your breath or breathe deeply enough. You may feel as though you are out of shape and constantly tired.

Asthma symptoms, also called asthma flare-ups or asthma attacks, are often caused by allergies and exposure to allergens such as pet dander, dust mites, pollen or mold. Non-allergic triggers include smoke, pollution or cold air or changes in weather. Children with asthma may show the same symptoms as adults with asthma: coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath. In some children chronic cough may be the only symptom. If your child has:

  • Coughing that is constant or that is made worse by viral infections, happens while your child is asleep, or is triggered by exercise and cold air
  • Wheezing or whistling sound when your child exhales
  • Shortness of breath or rapid breathing, which may be associated with exercise
  • Chest tightness (a young child may say that his chest "hurts" or "feels funny")
  • Fatigue (your child may slow down or stop playing)
  • Problems feeding or grunting during feeding (infants)
  • Avoiding sports or social activities
  • Problems sleeping due to coughing or difficulty breathing

Bronchitis

 
What is Bronchitis?
 

Bronchitis means that the tubes that carry air to the lungs (the bronchial tubes) are inflamed and irritated. When this happens, the tubes swell and produce mucus. This makes you cough. There are two types of bronchitis:

  • Acute bronchitis usually comes on quickly and gets better after 2 to 3 weeks. Most healthy people who get acute bronchitis get better without any problems. See a picture of acute bronchitis.
  • Chronic bronchitis keeps coming back and can last a long time, especially in people who smoke. Chronic bronchitis means you have a cough with mucus most days of the month for 3 months of the year for at least 2 years in a row.
 
What are the symptoms?
 

The most common symptom of acute bronchitis is a cough that is dry and hacking at first. After a few days, the cough may bring up mucus. You may have a low fever and feel tired. The symptoms of either type of bronchitis may include:

  • Chest discomfort
  • Cough that produces mucus; if it's yellow-green, you are more likely to have a bacterial infection
  • Fatigue
  • Wheezing
  • Fever -- usually low
  • Shortness of breath worsened by exertion or mild activity
  • Wheezing

Acute bronchitis symptoms usually start 3 or 4 days after an upper respiratory tract infection. Most people get better in 2 to 3 weeks. But some people continue to have a cough for more than 4 weeks. Pneumonia can have symptoms like acute bronchitis. Because pneumonia can be serious, it is important to know the differences between the two illnesses. Symptoms of pneumonia can include a high fever, shaking chills, and shortness of breath.

Pneumonia

 

Pneumonia is a bacterial, viral, or fungal infection of one or both sides of the lungs that causes the air sacs, or alveoli, of the lungs to fill up with fluid or pus.

Symptoms can be mild or severe and may include a cough with phlegm (a slimy substance), fever, chills, and trouble breathing. Many factors affect how serious pneumonia is, such as the type of germ causing the lung infection, your age, and your overall health. Pneumonia tends to be more serious for children under the age of five, adults over the age of 65, people with certain conditions such as heart failure, diabetes, or COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), or people who have weak immune systems due to HIV/AIDS, chemotherapy (a treatment for cancer), or organ or blood and marrow stem cell transplant procedures.