Gurdev (Dave) Judge MD, an Allergist
Board Certified in Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Board Certified in Pediatrics
Allergy Doctor, Specializing in Pediatrics and Adult

Cary Office: (919) 859-5966
North Raleigh: (919) 870-6440
Wake Forest: (919) 562-7195
Accepting New Patients

Gurdev (Dave) Judge MD, an Allergist

Board Certified in Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Board Certified in Pediatrics
Allergy Doctor, Specializing in Pediatrics and Adult
Cary Office: (919) 859-5966
North Raleigh: (919) 870-6440
Wake Forest: (919) 562-7195
Accepting New Patients
Schedule An Appointment

Dr. Judge an Allergist, was Trained at Duke University Medical Center as a Allergy Doctor
Skin Allergy, Poison Ivy, Eczema, Atopic Dermatitis, Urticaria, Hives, Swelling, Cosmetics, Chemical & Implant Allergy, Practicing in Cary, Raleigh & Wake Forest

Skin Allergy

 
Scratching the Surface on Skin Allergies
 

Do you often suffer from red, bumpy, scaly, itchy, inflamed/blistered or swollen skin? Dry skin, sunburn or an insect bite may be the cause. Or, you may have a skin allergy. The most common skin allergies include eczema, hives/angioedema and contact dermatitis.

Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)

 
Atopic Dermatitis Symptoms
 
  • Itchy bumps, blisters or very dry skin
  • Appear as red to brownish-gray colored patches
  • May "weep" or leak fluid that crusts over when scratched
  • Eczema in infants often appears on the cheeks, forehead or scalp
  • Eczema in children and adolescents at the bend of the elbow joint, wrists, behind the knees and behind the ears
  • Might have extra crease, called a Dennie's line, across the lower eyelids.

Urticaria (hives)

 
Urticaria (Hives) Symptoms

Urticaria is another term for "hives." The condition affects an estimated 20 percent of the population at one time or another in their lives. An episode of hives can start as itching, followed by swollen, red welts. The itching may be mild or severe. Scratching, alcoholic beverages, exercise, and emotional stress may worsen the itching

 
  • Can cover large areas and migrate from one spot to another
  • Itch
  • Range in size
  • Appear anywhere on the body

Angioedema (swelling)

 

Angioedema appears on the eyelids, lips, tongue, hands and feet and is typically not red or itchy—just swollen. The allergens that trigger hives may take days to leave the body, so an allergist/immunologist may prescribe antihistamines or in severe cases, steroids. Other tips for symptom relief are cool showers, applying a cool compress or wearing loose/light clothing.

Contact Dermatitis

 

When certain substances come into contact with your skin, they may cause a rash called contact dermatitis. Irritant contact dermatitis is often more painful than itchy, and is caused by a substance damaging the part of your skin it comes into contact with. The longer your skin is in contact with the substance, or the stronger the substance is, the more severe your reaction will be. These reactions appear most often on the hands and are frequently work-related.

 
Allergens that commonly trigger allergic contact dermatitis include:
 
  • Plants (poison oak, poison ivy)
  • Metals, particularly nickel allergy. Nickel is found in jewelry (earrings, watches,necklaces), buttons (inside portion of jeans), or belt buckles
  • Fragrances (including those found in lotions, shampoos, and other cosmetics)
  • Preservatives (found in lotions, or leather and other fabrics)
  • Rubber (gloves)
  • Hair dyes
  • Glues
  • Medications (Neosporin)

Poison Ivy

 

Poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac are common plants of the genus toxicodendronthat contain an oil called urushiol. When urushiol oil touches the skin, many people develop an itchy and inflamed rash due to an immune response called contact dermatitis.

 
How can I identify poison ivy, oak, and sumac?
 

Both poison ivy and poison oak grow clusters of three leaves, which has lead to the saying "leaves of three, let it be!" to help remember how to identify the plant.